A Doorway to Silence: The Contemplative Use of the Rosary

This book is written by Robert Llewelyn, while a chaplain of the Julian Shrine at Norwich, England. In a sense, this book stands unique from other books about the rosary especially filled-up with meditations on the mysteries. Fr. Llewelyn simply invites every pray-er of the Rosary to make it the springboard to Silence. Here’s a part of the introduction of the book which I deem captures the gist of the book:

“The rosary, in something like its present form, has been in use in the Western Church for almost a thousand years and a custom which has so universally stood the test of the centuries should not lightly be discarded. Much of our prayer life will lie the other side of the rosary but without its use (or the use of something similar) it may be that many will never discover the country beyond. The prayers and structure of the rosary are unique to the Christian Church, but the principle is common, if not universal, beyond the Christian faith. Our awareness of this should serve to enhance its value.

The rosary has been, for many, a way in to silent prayer. The silence of the heart before God is of the essence of the prayer life. It is well for newcomers to the rosary to understand this. We start with the mind gently enfolded in the words (or it may be resting in one of the mysteries) and very properly, they are the focus of our attention. After a while that focus is likely to begin to disappear from consciousness, and this is where the beginner may become alarmed. What is happening, however, is that – so long as the intention to pray remains – the heart is being drawn gently into the silence beyond the words. The quality of the silence which may be ours when the words have dropped away completely at the end of the exercise will itself be proof that this process has been taking place. Anyone who is experienced in the use of the rosary will at once understand the significance of what is being said. The newcomer will probably understand only after becoming acquainted with the practice.

It is advisable to say the rosary plainly and simply as an offering to God without introspective glances to inquire whether what we are doing is meaningful or not. The exercise, if it is to be begun at all, must be begun in faith and it is in the power of faith that it is to be carried through.”

Mary Help of Christians – pray for us…

 

2 thoughts on “A Doorway to Silence: The Contemplative Use of the Rosary

  1. Kapatid, this indeed is a “new” insight on the rosary. Majority would use the rosary as a meditative means to pray. Even in the fora that I have attended last year on contemplative prayer would always introduce this use of the rosary for beginners like me…

    “What is happening, however, is that – so long as the intention to pray remains – the heart is being drawn gently into the silence beyond the words. The quality of the silence which may be ours when the words have dropped away completely at the end of the exercise will itself be proof that this process has been taking place.”

    The statement above echoes what my RS teacher in college used to say. He introduced meditations in our class. He would say that if we pray, and we found out we lose the words to say, it is not yet the time to stop praying, for we are beginning our commune with God…🙂

    Dito na pala ang main blog ko kapatid:

    http://travelandsnaps.com

    Ang dami mo palang bagong entries… Babalik ako para magbasa ng iba pa…🙂

    Again, welcome back!!!

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